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Posti to get Key Flag symbol

28.04.2016

The Association for Finnish Work has granted Posti Ltd membership in the association and the right to use the Key Flag symbol. The Key Flag stands for Finnish work and indicates that the service has been produced or the product has been manufactured in Finland using Finnish labor.

The main criterion for granting the Key Flag is always that the product must have been manufactured or the service produced in Finland. In addition, a domesticness rate is taken into consideration, which must be at least 50 per cent of the absorption cost. Costs related to the service, such as personnel expenses, subcontracting and material purchases, are taken into consideration in the absorption cost.

A company applying for the Service Key Flag must have a large share of Finnish ownership and its executive management and head office must be situated in Finland.

- Domesticness is important to Posti. We fulfill all the criteria set for awarding the Key Flag and want that this will also be seen in our services and operations. It is easy to tell from the familiar Key Flag that Posti is Finnish, operates in Finland and offers work to Finns, says Jukka Rosenberg, who is responsible for Parcel and Logistics Services at Posti.

The Key Flag symbol is well known

According to a survey conducted by the Association for Finnish Work, 86% of Finns are aware of the Key Flag. Most of the respondents (57%) are also of the opinion that the Key Flag affects purchase decisions very much or quite a lot.

According to Tero Lausala, Managing Director of the Association for Finnish Work, people consider purchasing a domestic product a means of social influence and value selection that promotes Finnish competitiveness and well-being.

- Consumers attach positive images of Finnishness, reliability, credibility and employment to the Key Flag. With the Key Flag, companies can communicate to their stakeholders that the service is domestic and that their ownership base is Finnish, says Tero Lausala.